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Just why did YCDTOTV go off the air? I really want to know

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  • Just why did YCDTOTV go off the air? I really want to know

    I know this has been brought up before, but I really to know. Why did YCDTOV go off the air in 1990? Was it Nickelodeon's decision to pull the plug on the show? Or was it the producer's, Roger Price's decision? Or was it a mutual decision? I remember the last new epsiodes were shown somewhere around the spring of 1990, I could be wrong. Please if anyone has any answers, I'd like to know.

  • #2
    I think it was actually CJOH's decision. Nickelodeon continued to air episodes after the series had actually ceased production so it wasn't a Nick decision.
    Bob Morris
    Head writer #3 - You Still Can't

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    • #3
      It couldn't have been Nick's decision anyway, since they never owned the rights to the show outright. They just had airing rights.
      Get YCDTOTV and many other shows on DVD. Go to and vote. Registration is FREE!!!

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      • #4
        Not true. Nick was responsible for ordering the 1989 and 1990 season episodes. Had they not done so, there would not have been any production after 1987. Nick had enough episodes to repeat into infinity (100+), so from their perspective there was no need to continue bankrolling the show. As the show had long ago lost what popularity it had with the Canadian market, CJOH wasn't about to keep producing a show that it couldn't pay for or get ratings for. So things ended.

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        • #5
          Didn't the 89-90 episodes do well in Canada as oppose to the states? Why would CJOH not want to continue producing episodes up there, if it had done well up in Canada for those 2 seasons?

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          • #6
            Actually, it was Roger Price's decision. He'd gotten burned out by 1987, as well as burned when the Hollywood deal connected to Morning Star, Evening Star fell through. That's why there was a hiatus. When he decided to quit the show for good, the execs decided they didn't want to make any more without him.
            Robert A. Black, YCDTOTV writer 1985-86
            http://www.rablack.com

            Ah yes... very tricky, those Argentinians...

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            • #7
              Yeah I also heard Roger Price wasn't happy with the direction of the show when the 89 episodes were produced. The show did loose its popularity by then and it just wasn't as good as it once used to be.

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              • #8
                Well, the politics of it all got really weird. Nickelodeon was growing, and wanted to do their own shows in their own studios, instead of farming them out to little backwater TV stations in places like Ottawa. Even as early as 1985, there was a feeling that they resented having to buy their top-rated show from a "subcontractor." The Turkey Television fiasco kind of represented the craziness of what was going on.

                At the same time, Roger was doing more and more of the show by himself, to the point in the final seasons where only he and Adam Reid were writing the scripts. I don't know if his budget got cut and he had to work that way, or if he just wanted to do things that way. Either way, it had to have taken its toll on him.
                Robert A. Black, YCDTOTV writer 1985-86
                http://www.rablack.com

                Ah yes... very tricky, those Argentinians...

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                • #9
                  so thats one reason we dont see a lot of the old shows on reruns because nick had a inferiority complex about the small companies makeing most of the great shows

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                  • #10
                    I doubt it's just about an inferiority complex - there are practi\cal reasonas for Nick (or any other network) would prefer to make theuir own shows. it gives them complete control overt he production and airing of the show, for one, and (potentially) makes it cheaper to keep the shows in reruns, because they don't need to pay rights to the production company. It also probably lowers the proifit margin needed for the show to be sucessful, as only one entity (the network) needs to make money off the show, instead of two (the network and the production company.)

                    In any event, I doubt that the production of these shows by outside companies has much to do with why they aren't aired on Nick anymore - earlier Nick produced shows like Hey, Dude and Salute Your Shorts aren't on either. The unique characterists of children's programming probably have more to do with this than anything: when good adult shows continue in reruns, they will continue to attract much of their original audience, as well as new viewers. While the same things can happen to good kids shows, these original viewers will quickly grow out of Nick's target audience, so they no longer matter for the demographics of the show. From Nick's (ony any other children's television network's) perspective, the only thing that matters is new viewers; and old shows aren't likely to draw enough of them.

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